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Travels with Mark A HitchHiker's Guide to the UniVerse

Part 1: Profiling the UniVerse

UniVerse® DBA and developers need a tool to help understand how the decisions about database operations and constructs affect performance. This tutorial introduces the UniVerse Profiler for constructing, running, and reporting tests which investigate the performance impact of different program options and system tuning decisions. Future articles will provide examples using the Profiler so you can see the impact on your own system.

Part 2: Sizing hashed files in UniVerse

Have you ever found a file you cannot size properly? Does it have lots of really large records and small records? No matter what you try, the FILE.STAT reports the file has groups over 200 percent full? Are you wondering how many records should you have in a group block? Do access patterns affect your decisions? This set of tutorials on file sizing explores the impact of factors that affect performance. These tutorials extend the foundation laid in the initial tutorial, Profiling the UniVerse. This tutorial builds a set of tests to measure these impacts so that you will understand why your rules of thumb work, and examines those cases where a different choice might improve performance. You can download the UniVerse account containing the tests.

Part 3: Sizing hashed files: Oversize records

Have you ever found a file you cannot size properly? Does it have a lot of large records and small records? No matter what you try, the FILE.STAT reports the file has groups over 200 percent full? How many records should you have in a group block? Do access patterns affect your decisions? This tutorial examines the performance impact of those large records that cause FILE.STAT to always report groups in 200 percent overflow. The results reveal when selecting a larger separation improves performance of large records and also how much a larger separation slows access to smaller records.

Part 4: File and performance implications

With this installment, continue to explore the factors that affect file performance. This tutorial starts by examining the file structure of dynamic files so you can see how they relate to the structure of static hash files. It then explores the dynamic file-splitting operation so you can make measurements of the process. And it wraps up with techniques that overcome the default separation and limits placed upon that selection for dynamic files.

Part 5: Increase dynamic array processing performance in UniVerse

This installment explores the effects of field caching in dynamic arrays. It starts by examining the dynamic array, and explores historical background on why code frequently processes dynamic array values in lieu of dynamic array fields. It then explores techniques for processing dynamic array values at the field level.

Part 6: File opens – The cost

With this installment, explore the cost of opening files. Measure opening simple hash files, dynamic files, and directory files, and measure the impact of adding indices to files. Time open distributed files, with and without indices, and examine variations by looking at OPENSEQ and OPENPATH.

.NET

U2.NET -- Develop a native MultiValue style master-detail application

This tutorial introduces UniData® and UniVerse® (U2) MultiValue add-ins for Visual Studio (U2.NET), Rocket U2's development tool for U2 MultiValue .NET applications. Develop a U2 MultiValue style master-detail application in C# in Visual Studio. U2.NET’s Visual Studio integration is demonstrated. Then quickly put together a .NET purchase order application from a Visual Studio environment. The demo database that was installed as part of your standard U2.NET Developer installation is used.

Access U2 databases from your .NET applications, Part 1: Overview of IBM Data Server Provider for .NET and IBM Database Add-ins for Visual Studio for UniVerse and UniData (IBM.NET)

The goal of this tutorial is to show UniVerse® and UniData® (U2) application developers how to develop a next-generation, master-detail ASP.NET Web application, Web service, and ASP.NET Crystal Report using IBM® Data Server Provider for .NET and IBM Database Add-ins. For U2 users, the master-detail relation plays an important role, as it is related to multi-value and multi-subvalue concepts. In the past, it was difficult to create a master-detail (multi-value,multi-subvalue) relation using Grid Controls, but now with ASP.NET 2.0 and Visual Studio, you can develop U2 Web applications without writing a single line of code. For an overview, refer to Part 1 of this series.

Access U2 databases from your .NET applications, Part 2: Build the next generation application using U2 databases, IBM.NET, and ASP.NET

The goal of this tutorial is to show UniVerse® and UniData® (U2) application developers how to develop a next-generation, master-detail ASP.NET Web application, Web service, and ASP.NET Crystal Report using IBM.NET. For U2 users, the master-detail relation plays an important role, as it is related to multi-value and multi-subvalue concepts. In the past, it was difficult to create a master-detail (multi-value,multi-subvalue) relation using Grid Controls, but now with ASP.NET 2.0 and Visual Studio, you can develop U2 Web applications without writing a single line of code. For an overview, refer to Part 1 of this series.

Access U2 databases from your .NET applications, Part 3: QuickStart samples accessing U2 tables and files using IBM.NET

This quick start tutorial shows how both Windows® C# and VB.NET applications can access a UniVerse® or UniData® database using SQL commands or basic subroutines using the IBM.NET. It covers defining the connections with or without connection pooling, and returning result sets or data sets, or XML or delimited data. Also, see how to use data readers, data sets, and XML. Furthermore, see how to call basic subroutines as stored procedures and pass parameters and get back parameter data. All .NET code and basic code is supplied, documented, and downloadable.

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